Reviews for Such a Fun Age, by Kiley Reid

Debra_reads_'s review
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5.0

Dear Such a Fun Age,
I knew going into reading you that I would probably enjoy you. Contemporary fiction is my jam. I had no clue HOW much I would enjoy you. Amira was such a likeable character, so relatable. I knew many people like her in my 20's. People who just had no idea what they wanted out of life. Alix was so perfectly unlikable and so unaware of who she was and how she was appearing to the rest of the world. And her girlfriends were just as detestable. There was so much layered inside this story; beyond race and class conversations, which were apparent. There was also the conversation of perception of the past and the lies we all tell ourselves. There is a lot about the person we are inside, and who we portray to the outside world and the difference between those people. This was a huge book with so many things that I will be thinking about for a while.

evergleaming's review
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emotional funny reflective fast-paced
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters centre-stage? Yes

5.0

Was probably going to be four star read until I got to that devastating final line.

Baddie Moyd's review
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3.0

I picked this book up because of the intriguing synopsis, but I soon discovered that the incident described in the synopsis is very quickly over and done with, and what follows is (what I believe to be) more of a focus on the effects that this incident had on the mother of the child involved.
While it was interesting to explore the events through the lens of the mother, I would have preferred more of a focus on our black main character and her thoughts on being the target in the incident. Instead, Amira is swept up in a romance which then becomes the entire focus of the book. This unfortunately meant that the commentary on race, privilege and performative allyship as it relates to our main character was pushed aside.
Overall, my feelings for this book are very neutral. At the end I was left wanting more, not because I was intrigued, but more because I felt there was more to be explored; the characters' resolutions felt very forced as their attitudes and stories hadn't reached a natural conclusion.

TheVietVegan's review
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5.0

This book was equally infuriating as it was refreshing. Infuriating because it was basically a bunch of people (mostly white folks) who were meddling and doing what they thought was best for Emira (protagonist who is Black). It was what seemed like an amalgamation of all the anti-racism works I've been reading all year and all of the theories, concepts, and lived experiences all woven into this book without putting names to the phenomena (micro-aggressions, stereotypes, racial profiling, consent, body autonomy, to name a few).

I really enjoyed the story telling of this book, I fell in love with Emira and Briar, and I liked the normalization of graduating college and not really knowing what you wanted to do for the rest of your life. I will be thinking about this book for a while.

krsweet's review
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challenging emotional reflective medium-paced
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters centre-stage? Yes

4.25

jmartin's review
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5.0

Phenomenal book that addresses race issues in a light manner without glossing over or glamorizing the issues.

Bookish.gemini's review
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5.0

LOVED THIS BOOK. Ohmygod I totally understand the hype around this book and am entirely on board with it. I read this book in 24 hours because it was a quick read, really interesting and broken down into parts for easy reading. The writing style is amazing and I literally just couldn’t have asked for a better book to read after a long day.
Centered around Alix a public speaker and her babysitter Emira. Emira is asked to watch Briar, Alix’s 3 year old daughter, around 11pm after an incident happened at the house. Emira of course steps in to help and brings Briar to the local grocery store where she gets accused of kidnapping Briar simply because Emira is black and Briar is white. After this night, relationships form, reality sinks in and true identities are discovered.
This book was more about race relations than I thought but that made for a much better book and the plot twists were screaming at me to see them by the end. I loved every character (except one, you know who I’m talking about) and I absolutely ADORED that there was a three year old main character. I wanted that child to be real so that I could take her home with me <3

RachelS's review
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2.0

The first chapter and the last 50 pages were the story I expected. I enjoyed those parts, but the majority of the book just fell flat for me. I also hate that Alex/Alix was the most fully developed character when she shouldn't be the main character in this story. There were so many missed opportunities here, which is a shame because the premise of the book was fantastic.

kiracanread's review
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3.0

This was a really interesting book that says a lot about preformative activism, it's incredibly hard hitting and I enjoyed reading it. I just thought that the plot was quite slow and I couldn't get behind the slow pacing, hence the 3 stars.

c1are's review
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challenging funny fast-paced
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters centre-stage? Yes

4.5

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