Reviews for How to Be Black, by Baratunde R. Thurston

gidsreadsthings's review
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funny informative reflective medium-paced

4.0

peachani's review
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I'm certain I would have liked this in 2012, but now, it just feels played.

esiban's review
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5.0

this is a hilarious insight into a lot of the nuances of being Black in america. i especially loved the parts about it in the workplace

blkMYMorris's review
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3.0

This book is a strange non-fiction melange of auto-bio, memoir, humor, and contemporary social issues.

It's funny in the same dry way you would expect for someone who writes for The Onion. I also thought the inclusion of his black panel was pretty funny but it was infrequently used.

I thought it got a little too preachy towards the end. It was an interesting discussion on 'racial policing', but there was too little of the memoir, and the final chapter too light on humor.

aFrugalFather's review
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3.0

Fun and fast read. Not as serious of a race discussion as "So You Want to Talk About Race Book by Ijeoma Oluo" with a lot of sarcastic humor, but not to the comedic level of "How Not to Get Shot: And Other Advice From White People Book by D. L. Hughley and Doug Moe" Sort of an in between.

moniker's review
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5.0

I definitely laughed out loud a lot while reading this book. Baratunde Thurston and the avengers he assembled for the interviews in this book are national treasures.

M.R.Dames's review
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3.0

It was fun.

CrankyLibrarian's review
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4.0

Baratunde Thurston is a pretty funny guy, although the best jokes in this memoir/stand-up routine are in the introduction. Part autobiography, part humorous manifesto, _How To Be Black_ chronicles Thurston's inner city childhood, private school education and successful career at Harvard and in corporate America, using his experiences to illustrate the perils of being "The Black Friend", "The Black Employee" (his chapter on corporate diversity programs is especially apt), "The Black Spokesperson" and, inevitably "The Angry Negro". Accompanied by essays both humorous and thoughtful by a panel of "professional black people" (plus a token Canadian), Thurston's trip down the memory lane of marginalization will evoke a chorus of "Mmm hmms" from anyone who's ever dreaded being served watermelon at the company picnic.

saintboleyn's review
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4.0

The writing was sharp and funny without being cynical, and I'm really starting to look at race relations in a different way. A really great read.

Beasley's review
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2.0

I had heard the author interviewed on "Fresh Air," and that stoked my interest in this book. I was disappointed in the book. I thought it should have either concentrated more on the details of his life, or it should have worked the humor angle harder and been a lot funnier than it was.

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